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 Imagine you are a pregnant woman, and you are about to sign the documents officially stating that your husband, who has been missing for the past seven years, is legally dead. And the day after you sign those papers, your husband shows up on your doorstep. Holy crap right? That’s how Absentia starts.
 It’s one o’ them low-budget independent types, but you aren’t reminded of the size of the budget very often—with the unfortunate exception of the (mercifully minimal) CGI. And it’s creepy right from the get go. It immediately has you on edge. They way that it was shot, the oddly off contrast lightning, there seems to be a good deal of thought gone into just building the atmosphere before we even meet the characters, which is always appreciated.
 There are a few scenes where the actors aren’t exactly the best, but it never gets to a point where you cringe. Except for the times where you’re cringing because it’s really eerie and spooky. I mean it, my associate watching it with me even copped to jumping out of fear at one point. It makes you jump, but it’s not the kind of movie that jumps out at you, again much appreciated.
 Absentia draws you along with a certain set of expectations, and whenever it gets the opportunity it goes beyond them. There might not be big ceremonial revelatory moments in the movie, but there are parts that go further than you think they would. It’s kind of shocking in a way, in like an “oh man, I did not think they were going to show that” kind of a way. 
 It’s the kind of horror movie that makes you forget it’s a horror movie before it punches you in the face with the horror. I’d say that Absentia is a must see. If nothing else, it’s a reminder that good characters and some creative camera work still makes for quality horror. Absentia Movie Reviews horror movies

Imagine you are a pregnant woman, and you are about to sign the documents officially stating that your husband, who has been missing for the past seven years, is legally dead. And the day after you sign those papers, your husband shows up on your doorstep. Holy crap right? That’s how Absentia starts.

It’s one o’ them low-budget independent types, but you aren’t reminded of the size of the budget very often—with the unfortunate exception of the (mercifully minimal) CGI. And it’s creepy right from the get go. It immediately has you on edge. They way that it was shot, the oddly off contrast lightning, there seems to be a good deal of thought gone into just building the atmosphere before we even meet the characters, which is always appreciated.

There are a few scenes where the actors aren’t exactly the best, but it never gets to a point where you cringe. Except for the times where you’re cringing because it’s really eerie and spooky. I mean it, my associate watching it with me even copped to jumping out of fear at one point. It makes you jump, but it’s not the kind of movie that jumps out at you, again much appreciated.

Absentia draws you along with a certain set of expectations, and whenever it gets the opportunity it goes beyond them. There might not be big ceremonial revelatory moments in the movie, but there are parts that go further than you think they would. It’s kind of shocking in a way, in like an “oh man, I did not think they were going to show that” kind of a way. 

It’s the kind of horror movie that makes you forget it’s a horror movie before it punches you in the face with the horror. I’d say that Absentia is a must see. If nothing else, it’s a reminder that good characters and some creative camera work still makes for quality horror.


 The Cabin In The Woods’ tag line is “you think you know the story”. And I did, but that’s probably just because I watch as many genre pictures as writer Joss Whedon. Now, I know that I am no stranger to hyperbole when it comes to talking about movies, and I don’t want you to get the impression that I’m overhyping this at all when I tell you that it is an instant horror classic and one of my favorite movies ever.
 There’s no irony to that sentence. I mean it. The Cabin In The Woods is that good. It changed the face of horror movies the way the original Scream did. It is every horror junkie’s wet dream, only instead of semen it’s blood. 
If that description turns you off in any way, you probably have no idea what I’m talking about, and that’s fine. You know why? Because I sat in that theater fully engrossed in The Cabin In The Woods with a bunch of other people, and they were just as into it as I was. Well, maybe not quite as into it, the whole bloody wet dream thing might not be their preferred metaphor, but that’s not the point.
If you don’t like horror movies, there’s a good chance you’ll enjoy this, there’s just so much fun to be had, and that’s what the horror genre is about at its core. You get scared and you have fun doing it. If you don’t like this movie, watch it again because you’re wrong. I’m sorry, but this time it is non-negotiable. The Cabin In The Woods is a great film that will be talked about for decades. It will be heavily rented each Halloween. It ought to be put on the pedestal next to Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Evil Dead, and The Thing (and I mean the originals of all of those, damn I can’t believe there’s a remake for all three… man). 
If you’ve been reading along with me hear for any amount of time you’ve probably noticed my preponderance for horror movies, so there’s only about 50% ego when I say I know what the hell I’m talking about here. If you don’t have fun watching The Cabin In The Woods, you don’t know what fun is.
Written by: Fil VesterDaily Vidette Blogger cabin in the woods movies movie reviews

The Cabin In The Woods’ tag line is “you think you know the story”. And I did, but that’s probably just because I watch as many genre pictures as writer Joss Whedon. Now, I know that I am no stranger to hyperbole when it comes to talking about movies, and I don’t want you to get the impression that I’m overhyping this at all when I tell you that it is an instant horror classic and one of my favorite movies ever.

There’s no irony to that sentence. I mean it. The Cabin In The Woods is that good. It changed the face of horror movies the way the original Scream did. It is every horror junkie’s wet dream, only instead of semen it’s blood. 

If that description turns you off in any way, you probably have no idea what I’m talking about, and that’s fine. You know why? Because I sat in that theater fully engrossed in The Cabin In The Woods with a bunch of other people, and they were just as into it as I was. Well, maybe not quite as into it, the whole bloody wet dream thing might not be their preferred metaphor, but that’s not the point.

If you don’t like horror movies, there’s a good chance you’ll enjoy this, there’s just so much fun to be had, and that’s what the horror genre is about at its core. You get scared and you have fun doing it. If you don’t like this movie, watch it again because you’re wrong. I’m sorry, but this time it is non-negotiable. The Cabin In The Woods is a great film that will be talked about for decades. It will be heavily rented each Halloween. It ought to be put on the pedestal next to Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Evil Dead, and The Thing (and I mean the originals of all of those, damn I can’t believe there’s a remake for all three… man). 

If you’ve been reading along with me hear for any amount of time you’ve probably noticed my preponderance for horror movies, so there’s only about 50% ego when I say I know what the hell I’m talking about here. If you don’t have fun watching The Cabin In The Woods, you don’t know what fun is.

Written by: Fil Vester
Daily Vidette Blogger


 Korea seems like a very angry place.
Judging from the amount of revenge flicks coming from that country, everyone seems to hate everyone else, and dammit if they aren’t awesome movies to boot. If you are a fan of badass action, killer revenge plots, twisted antagonists, impressively complex shooting styles—basically anything in movies that’s cool, then you ought to become well versed in these kind of movies. The big ones to look for are Oldboy and Vengeance.
 And I would say now you add the movie Bedeviled. Chul-soo Jang’s directorial debut is a revenge movie all its own. It follows Hae-won, a professional woman living in Seoul who is witness to a crime, to escape the pressures of city life. She goes on a vacation to the island her grandparents lived on to visit her childhood friend Bak-nam.
 Bak-nam is not leading the picture perfect island life. She’s basically a slave to everyone else on the island, two rather brutish fellows—one her husband t’other his brother—and a gaggle of old women. Well Bak-nam asks Hae-won to sneak her off the island, and Hae-won feels a mite bit apprehensive. That’s when Bak-nam cuts loose and the movie takes a turn.
 What had previously been a dauntingly intense drama transforms in the blink of an eye to a brutally violent horror picture.
 I mean it. The change is on a dime, suddenly the tension just skyrockets into abject terror. Well, that’s a bit of hyperbole, but I’m being serious when I tell you that it gets right scary right quick.
 The first half is actually pretty engaging, pulling you along, building the tension at a decent pace. And then that halfway point just kicks things into gear, but it doesn’t get silly or to ever be too much. It is legitimately frightening, yet very satisfying.
 It is most certainly not for the faint of heart, but Bedeviled is an awesome first entry for Chul-soo Jang. I’m gonna keep an eye on him. Bedevilled Korea movie reviews

Korea seems like a very angry place.

Judging from the amount of revenge flicks coming from that country, everyone seems to hate everyone else, and dammit if they aren’t awesome movies to boot. If you are a fan of badass action, killer revenge plots, twisted antagonists, impressively complex shooting styles—basically anything in movies that’s cool, then you ought to become well versed in these kind of movies. The big ones to look for are Oldboy and Vengeance.

And I would say now you add the movie Bedeviled. Chul-soo Jang’s directorial debut is a revenge movie all its own. It follows Hae-won, a professional woman living in Seoul who is witness to a crime, to escape the pressures of city life. She goes on a vacation to the island her grandparents lived on to visit her childhood friend Bak-nam.

Bak-nam is not leading the picture perfect island life. She’s basically a slave to everyone else on the island, two rather brutish fellows—one her husband t’other his brother—and a gaggle of old women. Well Bak-nam asks Hae-won to sneak her off the island, and Hae-won feels a mite bit apprehensive. That’s when Bak-nam cuts loose and the movie takes a turn.

What had previously been a dauntingly intense drama transforms in the blink of an eye to a brutally violent horror picture.

I mean it. The change is on a dime, suddenly the tension just skyrockets into abject terror. Well, that’s a bit of hyperbole, but I’m being serious when I tell you that it gets right scary right quick.

The first half is actually pretty engaging, pulling you along, building the tension at a decent pace. And then that halfway point just kicks things into gear, but it doesn’t get silly or to ever be too much. It is legitimately frightening, yet very satisfying.

It is most certainly not for the faint of heart, but Bedeviled is an awesome first entry for Chul-soo Jang. I’m gonna keep an eye on him.


 As per usual, I’m behind the times on this one. American Teen came out in 2008. Rock n’ Roll. Deal with it.
 It’s a documentary about a select few seniors from Warsaw Community High School in Warsaw, Indiana. And the way the movie is presented is more like one of those lame pseudo-reality shows like The Hills and Laguna Beach. With that melodramatic tone that makes it oddly absorbing.
 I never watched any of those kind of shows—I like shows about cowboys—but I did watch MTV’s show College Life. It was pretty silly for the most part, but the method of filming documentary style with the people being filmed seeing it as a reality show is kind of cool.
 It’s a style that seems much more palpable in American Teen though. The added layer of performance from these kids is interesting. It’s just high school, most people hate it, then it’s over. But somehow they get you want to relive the whole thing with these kids.
 I thought it was pretty cool. I could see how people might get bored, but I really enjoyed watching. American Teen is pretty neat, but, y’know… no hurry.
Written By: Fil VesterDaily Vidette Blogger American Teen Movies Movie reviews

As per usual, I’m behind the times on this one. American Teen came out in 2008. Rock n’ Roll. Deal with it.

It’s a documentary about a select few seniors from Warsaw Community High School in Warsaw, Indiana. And the way the movie is presented is more like one of those lame pseudo-reality shows like The Hills and Laguna Beach. With that melodramatic tone that makes it oddly absorbing.

I never watched any of those kind of shows—I like shows about cowboys—but I did watch MTV’s show College Life. It was pretty silly for the most part, but the method of filming documentary style with the people being filmed seeing it as a reality show is kind of cool.

It’s a style that seems much more palpable in American Teen though. The added layer of performance from these kids is interesting. It’s just high school, most people hate it, then it’s over. But somehow they get you want to relive the whole thing with these kids.

I thought it was pretty cool. I could see how people might get bored, but I really enjoyed watching. American Teen is pretty neat, but, y’know… no hurry.

Written By: Fil Vester
Daily Vidette Blogger


The Innkeepers is writer/director/editor Ti West’s answer to Paranormal Activity. After West’s 2009 atmospheric masterpiece House Of The Devil (it’s on Netflix instant, check it out) I was on the edge of my seat in anticipation for his follow up. Man oh man, does he deliver. Found footage style paranormal horror has been en vogue ever since Orin Peli scared us with PA, some entries have ben great (Grave Encounters), and some not so much. Well with The Innkeepers West went the paranormal route, but made it very clear that the shaky handycam and home movie style photography would not be found in his footage (see what I did there? That’s wordplay). The Innkeepers is about just that, the two person staff at the historic Yankee Pedlar Inn. The Yankee Pedlar is a real place, and the ghost story featured in the film is a real folk legend, and to add that extra layer of fear, West shot the whole movie on location in the Yankee Pedlar. It’s a gorgeous old colonial building, and West has an eye for distinctive photography, quite the combination. When we get to the Yankee Pedlar it’s going out of business, and the two working staff members are desperate to document the ghostly activities that haunt the place before it closes. We follow Claire, played by Sara Paxton. Paxton was also in the remake of Last House On The Left, which I prefer to the original (blasphemy I know). She’s a huge talent, and perfect for horror movies. She has an innocent and goofy charm in her eager ineptitude. She’s so sweet that you just want to throw your arm over her shoulder and croon “oh… honey”. There’s an excellent balance between horror and humor, the horror winning out in the end. But, as with any good ghost movie, the terror here comes from the tension and the brilliantly crafted atmosphere. There’s not a scare around every corner here, so when the scares do hit, they will blow your socks off (make sure you’re wearing some, otherwise who knows what will happen). The Innkeepers is a superb horror flick, a tad predictable at times, but the tension is so palpable that it hardly matters. It’s a haunting and eerie tale that proves a good ghost story doesn’t have to be shown through the eyes of the victim to be effective. Boo. Ti West The Innkeepers movies movie reviews
The Innkeepers is writer/director/editor Ti West’s answer to Paranormal Activity. After West’s 2009 atmospheric masterpiece House Of The Devil (it’s on Netflix instant, check it out) I was on the edge of my seat in anticipation for his follow up. Man oh man, does he deliver.

Found footage style paranormal horror has been en vogue ever since Orin Peli scared us with PA, some entries have ben great (Grave Encounters), and some not so much. Well with The Innkeepers West went the paranormal route, but made it very clear that the shaky handycam and home movie style photography would not be found in his footage (see what I did there? That’s wordplay).

The Innkeepers is about just that, the two person staff at the historic Yankee Pedlar Inn. The Yankee Pedlar is a real place, and the ghost story featured in the film is a real folk legend, and to add that extra layer of fear, West shot the whole movie on location in the Yankee Pedlar. It’s a gorgeous old colonial building, and West has an eye for distinctive photography, quite the combination.

When we get to the Yankee Pedlar it’s going out of business, and the two working staff members are desperate to document the ghostly activities that haunt the place before it closes. We follow Claire, played by Sara Paxton. Paxton was also in the remake of Last House On The Left, which I prefer to the original (blasphemy I know). She’s a huge talent, and perfect for horror movies. She has an innocent and goofy charm in her eager ineptitude. She’s so sweet that you just want to throw your arm over her shoulder and croon “oh… honey”.

There’s an excellent balance between horror and humor, the horror winning out in the end. But, as with any good ghost movie, the terror here comes from the tension and the brilliantly crafted atmosphere. There’s not a scare around every corner here, so when the scares do hit, they will blow your socks off (make sure you’re wearing some, otherwise who knows what will happen).

The Innkeepers is a superb horror flick, a tad predictable at times, but the tension is so palpable that it hardly matters. It’s a haunting and eerie tale that proves a good ghost story doesn’t have to be shown through the eyes of the victim to be effective.

Boo.